Historic Lympne Castle in Kent listed for £11million


A historic castle which has hosted prime ministers, Mick Jagger, Paul McCartney and the cast of TOWIE has been listed for £11million. 

Lympne Castle, which is listed with Savills, is a Grade I listed country estate steeped in history, which has also resulted in the property’s hefty price tag and its popularity as a party destination. 

Situated on the southeast coast in Kent just above Romney Marsh, the 137 acre plot encompasses both rural countryside and views of the sea. 

A historic castle (pictured) which has hosted prime ministers, Mick Jagger, Paul McCartney and the cast of TOWIE has been listed for £11million

Lympne Castle is a Grade I listed country estate steeped in history, which has also resulted in the property's hefty price tag. Pictured: One of the many rooms within the expansive property

Lympne Castle is a Grade I listed country estate steeped in history, which has also resulted in the property’s hefty price tag. Pictured: One of the many rooms within the expansive property

The house is situated on the southeast coast in Kent just above Romney Marsh and boasts many original features and has maintained an authentic look throughout

The house is situated on the southeast coast in Kent just above Romney Marsh and boasts many original features and has maintained an authentic look throughout

The 137 acre plot encompasses both the historic castle (pictured) set in the rural countryside as well as various others properties and outbuildings

The 137 acre plot encompasses both the historic castle (pictured) set in the rural countryside as well as various others properties and outbuildings

Visitors and residents are treated to an incredible blend of rolling countryside and seaside views, all of which can be seen from the impressive property

Visitors and residents are treated to an incredible blend of rolling countryside and seaside views, all of which can be seen from the impressive property

The medieval property sits at the top of the escarpment –  a steep or long cliff – providing residents and visitors with breathtaking views of the surrounding area.

The interior of the magnificent property still maintains the building’s historic origins with elements such as the exquisite exposed wood on the King Post roof inside the Great Hall.

Many of the rooms in the property remain wood paneled, have large open fireplaces as well as stone elements, in-keeping with its original style. The property also features a grand hall, two towers and several spiral staircases.

Light floods the property through the ornate Gothic traceried windows – an architectural device by which windows are divided into sections of various proportions by stone bars or ribs of moulding. 

The interior of the magnificent property still maintains the building's historic origins with elements such as the exquisite exposed wood on the King Post roof inside the Great Hall

The interior of the magnificent property still maintains the building’s historic origins with elements such as the exquisite exposed wood on the King Post roof inside the Great Hall

The medieval property sits at the top of the escarpment - a steep or long cliff - providing residents and visitors with breathtaking views of the surrounding area (pictured)

The medieval property sits at the top of the escarpment – a steep or long cliff – providing residents and visitors with breathtaking views of the surrounding area (pictured)

Many of the rooms in the property remain wood paneled, have large open fireplaces as well as stone elements, in-keeping with its original style

Many of the rooms in the property remain wood paneled, have large open fireplaces as well as stone elements, in-keeping with its original style

Light floods the property through the ornate Gothic traceried windows - an architectural device by which windows are divided into sections of various proportions by stone bars or ribs of moulding

Light floods the property through the ornate Gothic traceried windows – an architectural device by which windows are divided into sections of various proportions by stone bars or ribs of moulding

As well as the main building, the £11million property also comes with several cottages on the land as well as a flat for staff and a restaurant.

As well as impressive interiors, the property also boasts perfectly maintained gardens and views spanning for miles around. 

On some days, when the weather is particularly clear, it is even possible to see the French coast from the property.

There are several walled gardens, including one which houses a swimming pool with a surrounding lawn and paved terrace – perfect for the sunny summer months. 

Perfect for entertaining, another walled garden contains a kitchen garden which also has a variety of fruit trees and bushes lining the walls, including apples, peaches and raspberries.

On some days, when the weather is particularly clear, it is even possible to see the French coast from the property

On some days, when the weather is particularly clear, it is even possible to see the French coast from the property

As well as the main building, the £11million property also comes with several cottages on the land as well as a flat for staff and a restaurant

As well as the main building, the £11million property also comes with several cottages on the land as well as a flat for staff and a restaurant

There are several walled gardens, including one which houses a swimming pool with a surrounding lawn and paved terrace -

The property is the perfect UK-based getaway for the summer months

There are several walled gardens, including one which houses a swimming pool with a surrounding lawn and paved terrace – perfect for the sunny summer months

Perfect for entertaining, another walled garden contains a kitchen garden which also has a variety of fruit trees and bushes lining the walls, including apples, peaches and raspberries while others offer residents a glimpse of the expansive views (pictured)

Perfect for entertaining, another walled garden contains a kitchen garden which also has a variety of fruit trees and bushes lining the walls, including apples, peaches and raspberries while others offer residents a glimpse of the expansive views (pictured)

There are also various outbuildings to take advantage of, including several glass houses, potting sheds, barns, stables, a tack room for housing riding equipment and a summer house. 

The property is currently used as a thriving wedding venue and often plays host to various functions. 

The Only Way Is Essex has used Lympne Castle several times to host events, including a Christmas special in 2014 which saw the cast singing carols in the grounds. 

It was also used in a royal wedding season finale in May 2018 after Prince Harry married Meghan Markle at Windsor castle. Several of the female cast members all dressed in white gowns. 

In addition, in September 1978, Paul McCartney’s Wings recorded sessions at Lympne Castle for their 1979 album Back to the Egg. 

The Only Way Is Essex has used Lympne Castle several times to host events, including a Christmas special in 2014 which saw the cast singing carols in the grounds

The Only Way Is Essex has used Lympne Castle several times to host events, including a Christmas special in 2014 which saw the cast singing carols in the grounds

Lympne Castle: The Grade I listed country estate built on a Roman tower which was once home to St Thomas Becket

Lympne Castle is a 15th Century moated manor built on the site of a former Roman tower – part of a former fortress known as Stufall. Remains of the fort, while situated on private land, are still visible to this day. 

The first part of the castle, which sat on the edge the cliff overlooking the Romney Marshes, was built in the 1080’s for the Archdeacons of Canterbury. 

Perhaps one of its best-known residents was St Thomas Becket – the former Archbishop of Canterbury from 1162 until his murder in 1170. He engaged in conflict with Henry II over the rights and privileges of the Church and was murdered by followers of the king at Canterbury Castle. 

The building belonged to the church until 1850 after Archdeacon Croft died and was sold to Major Lawes of Dover who rented it out to a farmer. 

The property had to undergo some serious renovation by Sir Robert Lorimer in the 20th Century on behalf of Francis John Tennant after falling into disrepair. 

According to The Times, in 1962 the property was then purchased by Harry and Deidre Margary for £30,000 before Robert Taylor bought it from the couple in 2000. 



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