Where to go and what to try


Sampling Italian cuisine is sightseeing for your palate. The tour plan: Start with fresh ingredients and talented cooks, take in a city’s personality, and seek out a happy dining crowd. Experiencing Italy’s cafés, cuisine, and wines is a joy, and as the capital of Tuscany, Florence offers a particularly satisfying spread.

Tuscan cuisine is hearty and simple farmer’s food: grilled meats, high-quality seasonal vegetables, fresh herbs, prized olive oil, and rustic bread. Tuscan riboleta combines these ingredients into a savory bean-and-bread soup. If a dish’s name ends with alla toscana or alla fiorentina, that means it’s cooked in the Tuscan or Florentine style –usually a preparation highlighting local products.

Restaurant competition in Florence is fierce, so it’s easy to find delicious Tuscan specialties at fair prices – even in the most touristy zones. But for the most authentic ambience and better-quality meals, I like to hike across the Arno River to the quiet Oltrarno neighborhood.

When Steves is looking fo authentic ambience and better-quality meals, he hoofs it across one of the Arno River bridges into the quiet enclave of Oltrarno.

This is where I find the tastiest bistecca alla Fiorentina – thick T-bone steak, generally grilled very rare and lightly seasoned. The best (and most expensive) is from the white Chianina breed of cattle you’ll see grazing throughout Tuscany.

But dining out is only one option for foodies. The heart of the food scene in Florence is the trendy Industrial Age, steel-and-glass Mercato Centrale (Central Market). Along with all the must-see museums, this market is one of the great sights in Florence. The ground floor is a thriving edible wonderland of vendors selling meat, fish, produce, and other staples to a mostly local clientele. And the upstairs is a bustling food court open late into the evening.

Florence's Mercato Centrale bursts with colorful meats, olives, produce, and cheeses – perfect for cobbling together a fresh Florentine picnic.

I come here to gather fresh mozzarella cheese, olives, fruit, and crunchy bread for a casual picnic. But these days, picnickers like me need to be discreet – Florence now bans eating on public sidewalks and doorsteps in its historic center (and violators risk a hefty fine).

At the market’s tripe stand, it’s easy to see that locals eat just about every bit of the cow … and some bits unique to the bull, too. Tourists may find it hard to stomach, but Florentines’ favorite quick lunch is a panino (sandwich) of trippa or lampredotto  – the lining from the second and fourth stomach of a cow, respectively – slow-boiled to tender perfection.

Offal sandwiches originated as an affordable source of protein for working-class Florentines. While on lunch breaks from chipping trapped statues out of blocks of marble, Michelangelo would swing by a Florentine market and dig into a bun stuffed with stewed organs. The city’s longstanding love affair with this sandwich nearly faded away a few years back, but the recent worldwide trend towards “nose-to-tail” eating has kicked off a renaissance of food carts selling this local favorite.



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